Health Sciences Students Provide Health Care in Guatemala

Student taking blood pressure of Guatemalan childDuring Belmont’s spring break last March, students and faculty from the nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy and social work programs traveled to Guatemala to provide health screenings, patient teaching programs and medications and vitamins to citizens in Antigua. The trip was made possible through the university’s partnership with a Guatemalan coffee company, Kafes Guatemala, through its CoffeeMed Program. The students and faculty served over 350 people.

Belmont’s College of Health Sciences and Nursing has been involved with the CoffeeMed Program for the last three years, serving more than 800 patients. The program aims to provide basic needs to workers on Guatemalan coffee plantations who don’t always work under ideal conditions. In addition, the program takes students on a hands-on tour of plantations, hoping they will realize the importance of their involvement. Students who participate in the program are expected to fund the trip themselves by selling coffee from Kafes Guatemala in their communities.

In addition to current students and faculty, 2015 nursing graduate Claire Zetak served as a team leader on the trip. Zetak noted the importance of student engagement in an interview conducted recently with Roast Magazine. “In the health care profession, interdisciplinary works are always taking place,” said Zetak. “Nurses are working with doctors or physical therapists or pharmacists, so this is an example of what they’ll be doing in their future careers.”

Founder and President of Kafes Guatemala Pablo Castaneda realizes the value of the help Belmont students bring to Guatemala and expressed his gratitude for their work. “Thank you, Belmont students, for your love for others,” Castaneda said. “Never forget you can change lives for good. Your love for others is impacting so many lives, and it goes beyond medical attention to proving you are serving a living God.”

College of Health Sciences and Nursing Hosts Health Care Academy

Belmont’s College of Health Sciences and Nursing recently hosted a one-day session for high school students interested in pursuing careers in health care through the 2016 Maury Academy for Students in Health (MASH).

A two-week summer camp for local students, MASH included individual sessions designed to expose participants to diverse areas of medicine and health care. Students interacted with health care expects including physicians, registered nurses, medical & radiologic technologists, respiratory therapists and pharmacists to learn about physical assessment, casting, suturing, medical terminology and more.

In a post-survey of their experiences at Belmont, one student commented on the University’s use of technology throughout its curriculum saying, “I enjoyed working with the mannequins. They were super cool! I did not know that our world had that advanced of technology. It is quite amazing.”

Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame Announces 2016 Inductees

Hall of Fame’s second class represents Tennessee’s greatest health and health care pioneers

The Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame announced the six health care professionals selected as the Hall of Fame’s second class of inductees at a luncheon held on Belmont University’s campus Tuesday. With a mission to honor men and women who have made significant and lasting contributions to the health and health care industries, the Hall of Fame was created by Belmont University and the McWhorter Society and is supported by the Nashville Health Care Council, a Hall of Fame Founding Partner.

Chair of the McWhorter Society and Chairman of Medcare Investment Funds Dr. Harry Jacobson said, “This group of six individuals embodies some of the greatest talent our state has ever seen. With representatives from all corners of Tennessee who have made a significant impact on their communities through their work as leaders, practitioners, executives and scientists, the Hall of Fame is honored to name such a deserving group of health care legends as inductees.”

The nomination process began in January and was open to practitioners, executives, entrepreneurs, mentors, teachers, scientists, researchers, innovators or any person with a connection to the health or health care field. Nominees must have:

  • Been born, lived or have worked in Tennessee
  • Made a significant impact and lasting contribution to health care at the local, state, national or international level
  • Exhibit the highest ethical and professional character
  • Serve as an outstanding role model in their community

Among the more than 35 highly qualified candidates nominated, the inductees were reviewed by a Selection Committee made up of health and health care leaders from across the state. Selected inductees represent some of Tennessee’s greatest health and health care pioneers, leaders and innovators.

Inducted individuals include:

  • Jack Bovender: Retired Chairman and CEO of Hospital Corporation of America, Member of the National Health Care Hall of Fame, Credited with the rescue of patients in an HCA hospital during Hurricane Katrina
  • Dr. Stanley Cohen: Recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in medicine and physiology, Faculty Member at Washington University and Professor of Biochemistry at Vanderbilt, Completed research on epidermal growth factors that contributed to discoveries for individual cancer and immune system dysfunction therapiesDr. Colleen Conway-Welch: Dean Emerita of Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Past Nashvillian of the Year, Served on President Reagan’s Commission on HIV Epidemic and the National Bipartisan Commissions of the Future of Medicare, Founder of Friends of the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research
  • Dr. Henry Foster: Professor Emeritus and Former Dean of Meharry College’s School of Medicine, Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Vanderbilt University, President Clinton’s Senior Advisor on Teen Pregnancy Reduction and youth Issues, Pioneered a national model for regionalized perinatal health care systems
  • Dr. Frank Groner: President Emeritus of Memphis’s Baptist Memorial Hospital, Commissioner of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals, Health Consultant to the federal government
  • Dr. Paul Stanton: President Emeriti and Professor Emeriti of Surgery of East Tennessee State University, Served as a member of the Governor’s TennCare Roundtable, Assisted in conducting the first review and recommendation of changes to Tennessee’s Medicaid program

In addition to recognizing Tennessee’s most influential health and health care leaders, The Hall of Fame will serve as an on-going educational resource to document the rich history that has contributed to Tennessee’s position as a leader for national health care initiatives.

Belmont’s President Dr. Bob Fisher said, “It is widely recognized that Tennessee is a central hub for health care in the United States, and with Nashville at the helm, our community has seen many individuals and organizations take significant strides to shape and advance the industry. Meanwhile, Belmont University has taken a significant role in undergraduate, graduate and executive health care education. The induction of these members into the Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame will help us inspire the next generation of health care leaders, while further promoting Tennessee’s booming success as the nation’s premiere health care hub.”

Created in 2015, the Hall of Fame inducted eight inaugural members last year including Dr. Thomas Frist, Jr., Dr. Thomas Frist, Sr., Dr. Ernest Goodpasture, Jack C. Massey, R. Clayton McWhorter, Dr. David Satcher, Dr. Mildred Stahlman and Danny Thomas.

OT Professor Recognized with the AOTA Roster of Fellows Award

Hachtel Fellow

Dr. Yvette Hachtel (left) receives the Roster of Fellows award.

Dr. Yvette Hachtel, professor of occupational therapy at Belmont, was recently honored by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) with the Roster of Fellows Award.  The Roster of Fellows recognizes occupational therapists who through their knowledge, expertise, leadership, advocacy, and guidance have made a significant contribution over time to the profession with a measured impact on consumers of occupational therapy services and/or members of the Association.

Dr. Hachtel was specifically honored for her significant contributions in education and advocacy.  She was cited for affecting the practice of over 30+ years’ worth of students and practitioners and for infusing professionalism and activism into their education and repertoire of skills.

Dr. Hachtel is the fourth faculty member from Belmont’s School of Occupational Therapy to be included in the Roster of Fellows.   Previously, Dr. Susan Young, Dr. Debra Gibbs and Dr. Lorry Kleinfeld have been recognized.

Health Science Students Attend Leadership Health Care Delegation in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Cathy Taylor, dean of Belmont’s Gordan Inman College of Health Sciences and Nursing, recently moderated a session at the Leadership Health Care Delegation in Washington, D.C. Taylor’s moderated session delivered by Dr. Meena Seshamani, director of the Office of Health Reform, who oversees the office charged with implementing the Affordable Care Act.

Seven Belmont nursing, occupational therapy and physical therapy doctoral students attended the conference with Taylor to network with industry leaders and decision makers. These students included Emmy Rice, Nicole Clark, Tim Zerwic, Joe Straatmann, Carleigh Smith, Kenneth Jenkins and Kristian Beach.

*Above photo provided by Keith Mellnick and Nashville Health Care Council

Occupational and Physical Therapy Students Participate in Aquifit Program

Associate Professor in the School of Occupational Therapy Natalie Michaels started the Aquifit program seven years ago with students from Tennessee State University. The program provides aquatic exercise for older adults and promotes wellness, socialization and enjoyment. The program has demonstrated improved balance, weight loss and decreased pain in individuals with arthritis as the buoyancy in chest deep water provides assistive movement to antigravity muscles, as well as resistance to muscles that are gravity assisted on land.

Aquifit 3Michaels is now including Belmont’s occupational and physical therapy students in the program. Students recently participated in the program at Del Webb Retirement Community and will do so again in April. The program is currently targeted to the older adult population, but the group plans to work with young adults with neuromuscular disabilities in the Metro Parks system next month and to eventually work with children with Down Syndrome.

Michaels said the community was impressed with the professionalism and intelligence of the Belmont students. “It’s been wonderful including students from two different disciplines in the activity. Having students from more than one perspective has made it a much more holistic experience both for the students and the participants,” she said. “There have also been community therapists from multiple disciplines assisting and a few faculty from other universities. I am extremely proud to work on this service activity with the OT and PT students from Belmont.”

Aquifit at Del WebbStudents who participated included occupational therapy students Alyssa Burlage, Amanda LaBonte, Jordyn Perry, Joseph Straatman, Jenae Stevens and Nicole Kmieciek and physical therapy students Brittany Ryan, Emmy Rice, Kelsey Marie Otten, Lindsey Schiller, Megan Rolfe and Shelly Witt.

Doctoral Health Science students honored for Thesis Abstracts

DayOnTheHill2016

Evan Pendygraft and Samantha Grishaber represent their research colleagues at the Graduate Education Day on The Hill.

Graduate students from two programs in Belmont University’s Gordon E. Inman College of Health Sciences & Nursing were recently honored by the Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools with the 2015-16 Outstanding Thesis Award.

Six students in the Occupational Therapy Doctoral program were recognized for their abstract entitled, “Prevalent Concerns Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Middle Tennessee.”  The students, Samantha Grishaber, Abby Hawkins, Evan Pendygraft, Chelsea Skaggs, Mary Beth Thiel and Nicole Wright, were mentored by Dr. Debra Gibbs, Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy.  The study identified health as the primary concern of community-dwelling adults that contribute to their ability to sustain independent living, followed by finances, memory, transportation and safety.

Kathryn D. Mitchell, a student in Belmont’s Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program, was also recognized for her study entitled, “Public Access to Naloxone: Provider Awareness and Prescribing Attitudes.”  Her project examined knowledge, attitudes, subjective norms, and prescribing intentions among nurse practitioners (NPs) working in adult primary care, family practice, pain management, and emergency department practice settings in response to state naloxone distribution laws.  Her study revealed that NPs are critical to successful implementation of this innovative approach to combat overdose deaths in Tennessee.

The abstracts were presented at the Graduate Education Day on the Hill for the Tennessee Legislature earlier this week.

Colleges of Health Sciences and Pharmacy to host Health Academy in June for 5th-8th graders

HealthAcademyThe College of Health Sciences and the College of Pharmacy will host a week-long day camp from June 6 through June 10 that will allow students in grades 5 through 8 to explore the different careers available in the health sciences fields and expose them to issues healthcare professionals deal with on a daily basis. Students will explore a real-world example of how different health professionals (pharmacy, physical therapy, nursing, occupational therapy, social work) collaborate and work inter-professionally to take care of a patient.  Click here to register.

Occupational Therapy Doctoral Program Earns Reaccreditation for 10 Years

Belmont’s Entry Level Doctorate Program in Occupational Therapy was recently granted a 10-year reaccreditation term from the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE). ACOTE awards an accreditation period of 5, 7, or 10 years with 7 years as the “standard number of years for reaccreditation” and 10 years granted to programs with “demonstrated exceptional educational quality and no areas of noncompliance.”

ACOTE’s primary purposes are quality assurance and program improvement/enhancement. To fulfill these purposes, ACOTE requires programs to engage in a self-study and submit an evaluative report. Although program evaluation is ongoing, the formal self-study process was initiated more than a year ago under the direction of Lorry Liotta-Kleinfeld, EdD, OTR/L, program chair, Yvette Hachtel, JD, OTR/L, self-study chair, and Debra Gibbs, interim OTD program director in conjunction with the Curriculum Committee and occupational therapy faculty, administration, students, graduates, fieldwork educators, staff and stakeholders. The self-study required faculty to participate in intensive reviews to assure compliance with ACOTE standards.

Prior to the onsite visit, current OTD Program Director Dr. Sabrina Salvant led a series of preparatory discussions in collaboration with faculty, students and stakeholders to further examine adherence to ACOTE standards. The on-site evaluation occurred from Nov. 9-11 and included interviews with senior leadership, administration, faculty, students, employers, fieldwork educators and graduates.

OTD students welcome OTA students from Nashville State

NSCC2015OTAFirst year doctoral students in Belmont’s Occupational Therapy program recently hosted students and faculty from the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) program at Nashville State Community College (NSCC) as part of their preparation for upcoming fieldwork experiences.

Ms. Donna Whitehouse, Associate Professor and Director of NSCC’s OTA program, was joined by OTA students, Chloe Morton, Emily Rivers, Joy Whitley, Donna Whitehouse, Casey Miller and Marcus Maclin in sharing information about the OTA curriculum, the roles and responsibilities of an occupational therapy assistant, and supervision guidelines.

The purpose of the class was to familiarize the students with how  occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants collaborate to deliver occupational therapy services.