College of Health Sciences Scholar in Residence Shares Insight on Social Leadership

Bankston speaking at a faculty lunch on February 22

Belmont’s College of Health Sciences recently welcomed Dr. Karen Bankston, associate dean for clinical practice, partnership and community engagement in the University of Cincinnati’s College of Nursing, to campus as a Scholar in Residence. From February 20-24, Bankston led students and faculty in convocations, lectures, small group discussions and even one-on-one conversations surrounding the role that diversity plays in the health care system. Bankston has been working in the health care industry for over 40 years in areas ranging from trauma care in the emergency room to psychological health. She spent her week at Belmont speaking to students and faculty on topics centered on social leadership in the 21st Century.

At her convocation event on February 22, Bankston discussed the history of health care in the U.S., starting with the conception of the idea that care should be provided to everyone, including those who can’t afford it, which surfaced during the Civil Rights Movement. She focused on how the industry has had to adapt, like everything else, to changes in technology, moving from an industrial society to a technological one and from a national consumer base to a global market. Due to these advancements in the way that society functions, the focus of health care shifted to meeting the needs of an audience that expected fast and immediate attention. The idea no longer seemed to be centered on the patients being served or on the quality of the service, but rather on the money that could be made through providing the quickest gratification.

“There is no health care industry in the United States,” Bankston said. “What we have in the U.S. is an illness care industry.” With the emphasis of care being placed on those who are already sick instead of also working to promote wellness and prevent illness from occurring in the first place, different areas within the industry are straying away from their common goal of providing care. Bankston raised the question, “When is it okay to let one’s rights take a backseat to cost and quality?”

Bankston also discussed the role that social leadership should play in creating change where and when change is needed. She described social leaders as the ones who “bridge the gap between what is and what should be” and encouraged students and faculty to always question why things are done the way they are.

Bankston’s visit gave CHS faculty members the opportunity to open a discussion regarding the role that social contexts play in creating disparities in the health care industry. This information is being considered moving forward as the School of Nursing works to launch a new curriculum this fall.

“Dr. Bankston challenged us with shared experiences and insights into our academic social responsibilities, and we’re especially grateful for her frank contributions to our on-going dialogue about diversity and inclusion.  She is an inspiration for future healthcare professionals,” said Dr. Cathy Taylor, dean of the College of Health Sciences.

“We know that the health care workforce needs to look more like the population we serve,” added Dr. Martha Buckner, associate dean and professor in the School of Nursing. “We lack diversity in our professions and we believe the dialogue generated around [Bankston’s visit] will help move us forward. We also know that health professions faculty need to be more diverse and we hope to inspire a future generation of diversity for academia.”

Physical Therapy Faculty, Alumni and Students Present at American Physical Therapy Association

PT Students present at conference

Belmont University’s School of Physical Therapy had a strong presence at the 2017 Combined Sections Meeting sponsored by the American Physical Therapy Association in February. Physical therapists from around the country gathered in San Antonio, Texas to present research, attend workshops and honor the academic achievements of the past year.

Belmont faculty, alumni and current students were among those attending the conference. The faculty had four presentations and seven posters highlighting their scholarly work including the platform presentation on clinical electrophysiology and wound management by Kathleen Galloway, PT, DSc, ECS.

Several alumni received recognition for specialty certifications including Kristin Story, PT, DPT (’07), the second physical therapist in Tennessee to receive the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary certification. An additional seven alumni were recognized for receiving specialty certifications in sports and orthopaedics.

Additionally, Elise Meade, PT, DPT  (’15) presented research that she completed as part of the Neurologic Residency Program at Vanderbilt Pi Beta Phi Rehabilitation Institute and Belmont. Meade graduated from the residency program in August 2016.

The School of Physical Therapy also had a strong student presence as Jenny Ellison, Abby Lester, Kyla Lydon, Megan Rolfe, Ashely Gowen and Amy Krichau  presented research on a national stage.

OT Doctoral Students Present Research at the Tennessee State Capitol

 Straatmann and Edwards with their research posterThird-year students in Belmont’s Doctoral Program in Occupational Therapy Joseph Straatmann and Emilie Edwards were recently selected to present their research at the Tennessee State Capitol as a part of Graduate Week. Straatmann and Edwards presented their research project to state legislators, Tennessee college deans and the Nashville community. Other colleges represented included UT-Martin, UT-Knoxville, Vanderbilt and Austin Peay.

“The primary focus of this poster presentation was to highlight the work that graduate programs were doing across the state,” said Straatmann. “We met wonderful people from all the local universities and had a chance to talk about our research. Not only did we present our poster, but we were able to network with many individuals in the Nashville community and universities.  We received great feedback and tips for future research projects and how we can improve on what we’ve done.”

Straatmann has been impressed with the opportunities he has received within the School of Occupational Therapy since his arrival at Belmont over two years ago. “As a member of the Belmont occupational therapy program, I have had opportunities to present at numerous conferences here in Tennessee, national conferences in other states and even international conferences that pass through Nashville. Our program, as well as Belmont, does a great job of allowing multiple ways for students to become active members in the community.”

Health Sciences Faculty and Staff Members Make Music to Support Down Syndrome Association

Michals and Christian at Hotel PrestonDr. Natalie Michaels, associate professor in Belmont’s School of Occupational Therapy and Michal Christian, academic support assistant in the School of Nursing, recently began making music together as a hobby. On February 20, the duo took their act to the community and played a small gig at Hotel Preston in Nashville, donating all their tip money to the Down Syndrome Association of Middle Tennessee. According to Michaels, they played “everything from The Girl from Ipanema to Whitney Houston to Lady Gaga,” and had a blast doing so.

Michaels has been writing music recently and has been playing flute and piano since she was ten years old. Christian is both a professional ballet dancer and musician. The two plan to announce a second gig that will be coming up in a few months and encourage anyone interested in hearing them play to “stay tuned.”

School of Occupational Therapy Receives Volunteer Award from HAPI

Members of the College of Occupational Therapy holding their awardBelmont University’s School of Occupational Therapy was recently selected for the 2017 Volunteer Friend Phoenix Award by the Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) for its commitment to helping strengthen the impact of the organization. The award was presented at the Phoenix Art Gala on February 16 at the Hilton Garden Inn Vanderbilt.

“The students from the Belmont University School of Occupational Therapy who have volunteered with the Healing Arts Projects, Inc. have been exceptionally helpful,” said Lynece Benton-Stewart, chair of the organization. “All the students have engaged fully in the service opportunity and made a real difference in the success of the undertaking.”

HAPI provides an avenue for persons in mental health and addiction recovery to express their creativity through a wide range of artistic endeavors.  In doing this, HAPI raises awareness in the community and helps combat the stigma that surrounds these disorders to promote understanding, acceptance and success.

OT Students Selected for Competitive Summer Institute

Can's headshotHerrera's headshotBelmont occupational therapy students Thu Can and Lexi Herrera were recently selected to participate in the 2nd annual Summer Institute for Future Scientists in Occupational Therapy, sponsored by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). The Institute is a 1-day program that aims to match potential student scientists with doctoral and post-doctorate mentors. The selection committee at AOTA received over 80 applications nationwide and selected Can and Herrera to complete a cohort of 30.

Participants of the Institute will meet with leading occupational therapy scientists in June to address topics such as possibilities within OT science, considerations when evaluating potential doctoral programs and career opportunities. Additionally, the students are invited to attend the 6th annual 2-day Occupational Therapy Summit of Scholars at Boston University.

College of Health Sciences and Nursing Receives ACE Grant, Hosts Stakeholder Summit

College of Health Sciences and Nursing hosted a Stakeholder Summit for their recent ACE grant receipt. A packed room began discussions surrounding the grant's use.

Belmont’s College of Health Sciences and Nursing recently hosted a Stakeholder Summit on campus to support the College’s Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) grant. Received from the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services, the grant provides funding for the development of three undergraduate educational modules for nursing, public health and social work students.

The Summit was held to survey area stakeholders on current gaps and recommendations for developing these modules. Speakers included the Deputy Commissioner Dr. Michael Warren from the State Health Department, Chief Medical Officer for HRSA/MCHB Dr. Aaron Lopata and Director of Community Development and Planning at Metro Health Department Tracy Buck.

Attendees discuss material at the ACE Stakeholder SummitIn addition to speakers, the event included opportunities for attendees to identify ACE topics to be included in Belmont’s new Educating Trauma Information Professionals Project. This project addresses the need to improve professional practices and promotes cross-fertilization among professions that touch children and families during sensitive periods of development and beyond. With no standard trauma-information care education model for undergraduates available, Belmont’s program seeks to create programming for health science students and identify and address knowledge and training needs among recent graduates and practicing professionals.

Dean of the College of Health Sciences and Nursing Dr. Cathy Taylor said, “We’re thrilled to receive this funding dedicated to enhancing multidisciplinary professional education and improving the health and well being of Tennessee’s children. Working with such esteemed partners toward achieving this common goal is sure to have long lasting impact.”

Nursing Students Featured in ‘Day in the Life of an Intern’ Story

Fresenius Medical Care North America (FMCNA) wanted to send a message to college students about how their internship program works, so they summoned three of their recent Belmont University interns to help tell the story. Chelsea Carter, Samantha Perkowski and Rachel Sutherland all served as Dialysis Clinic Interns in 2016 as a part of their studies in nursing.

The internship provided hands-on experience in the care of dialysis patients, an area where students don’t often have an opportunity for clinical practice. The FMCNA interviewed the students about some of the rewarding aspects of their internship experiences and had them describe a typical day of work, broken down into morning, mid-day and end-of-day routines. The students touched on the relationships they built with full-time employees and how their experiences at FMCNA contributed to their learning.

Check out the full feature here.

Graduate Nursing Student Awarded Clinical Placement and Financial Incentive through TRP

Glowacka's headshotFull-time Belmont MSN student Martyna Glowacka has been awarded a clinical placement and financial incentive through the Tennessee Rural Partnership (TRP). TRP, a subsidiary of the Tennessee Hospital Association, is a private non-profit organization established in 2006 to address the increasing challenges of providing healthcare in rural and underserved areas across the state. With this award, Glowacka will receive up to $7,500 in living expenses while in school and will be eligible for rural job placement as a family nurse practitioner and a $17,500 incentive after graduation.

“Martyna has benefitted from rural healthcare in her own life and is interested in giving back to her community. The TRP partnership has allowed Martyna the financial flexibility to be able to do that,” said Dr. Erin Shankel, assistant professor of nursing and Family Nurse Practitioner track coordinator.  “We are hopeful that more students will be able to benefit from rural placements in the future through our work with the TRP.”

Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame Announces Call for Nominations

The stage and audience at the Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame's 2016 Induction Ceremony

The Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame, an initiative to honor Tennessee’s finest health care leaders, is accepting nominations for its 2017 class via the organization’s website, www.tnhealthcarehall.com. Submissions will be accepted until March 10.

With a mission to honor men and women who have made significant and lasting contributions to the health care industry, the Hall of Fame seeks to recognize the pioneers who have formed Tennessee’s health care community and encourage future generations of innovators and leaders.

Created by Belmont University and The McWhorter Society and supported by the Nashville Health Care Council, a Hall of Fame Founding Partner, the Hall of Fame inducted its six-member 2016 class at a luncheon last year. Inductees included:

  • Jack O. Bovender, Jr.: Retired Chairman and CEO of Hospital Corporation of America, member of the National Health Care Hall of Fame, credited with the rescue of patients in an HCA hospital during Hurricane Katrina
  • Stanley Cohen, Ph.D.: Recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, Faculty Member at Washington University and Professor of Biochemistry at Vanderbilt, completed research on epidermal growth factors that contributed to discoveries for individual cancer and immune system dysfunction therapies
  • Henry W. Foster, Jr., M.D., FACOG: Professor Emeritus and Former Dean of Meharry College’s School of Medicine, Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Vanderbilt University, President Clinton’s Senior Advisor on Teen Pregnancy Reduction and Youth Issues
  • Frank S. Groner, LL.D.: President Emeritus of Memphis’s Baptist Memorial Hospital, Commissioner of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals, Health Consultant to the federal government
  • Paul E. Stanton, Jr., M.D.: President Emeritus and Professor Emeritus of Surgery of East Tennessee State University, served as a member of the Governor’s TennCare Roundtable, assisted in conducting the first review and recommendation of changes to Tennessee’s Medicaid program
  • Colleen Conway Welch, Ph.D., CNM, FAAN, FACNM: Dean Emerita of Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, past Nashvillian of the Year, served on President Reagan’s Commission on HIV Epidemic

Submitted nominees will be evaluated by the Hall of Fame’s Selection Committee, comprised of health care leaders across the state.

Potential inductees must have:

  • Been born, lived or have worked in Tennessee
  • Made a significant impact and lasting contribution to health care at the local, state, national or international level
  • Exhibit the highest ethical and professional character
  • Serve as an outstanding role model in their community

More information, as well as all previous Hall of Fame inductees, can be found here.