Health Sciences at Belmont University

10Nov/14Off

PT professor presents at 2 international conferences

VoightinJapanDr. Mike Voight, Professor of Physical Therapy, was recently a keynote presenter at the World Golf Fitness Summit in Carlsbad, California and at a meeting of the Japanese Athletic Trainer and Physiotherapy Association in Tokyo, Japan.

The World Golf Fitness Summit brings together over 30 of the world’s thought leaders in athletic performance to discuss the latest research and practical applications. Dr. Voight is noted as one of the leading authorities in the rehabilitation of orthopedic and sports injuries. At the Summit, he joined with Dr. Tom Byrd, an orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and arthroscopic surgery, to present a session about hip injuries in the golfer.

Earlier in the month, Dr. Voight co-presented a session to the Japanese medical community on the evaluation of movement disorders and the impact that poor movement has on the hip. Seventy-five Japanese physicians and physical therapist were in attendance.

10Nov/14Off

Three from School of Nursing elected to positions by Tennessee Nurses Association

MurabitoSmallBelmont University School of Nursing was well represented in a new slate of officers elected recently by the Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) at their annual assembly.  Dr. Sandy Murabito, Assistant Professor of Nursing, was selected as the President-elect for organization's governing body.  In addition, Tracy Wilson, Instructor of Nursing, was elected to the nominating committee and senior nursing major Daniel Maison was elected president of the Middle Tennessee Association of Student Nurses.

“This is wonderful recognition for nursing at Belmont," said Dr. Cathy Taylor, Dean of the Gordon E. Inman College of Health Sciences & Nursing.  "I have no doubt Ms. Wilson and Mr. Maison will excel in their new roles, and Dr. Murabito will provide the strong leadership the TNA presidency demands. She is an experienced advocate and will prove to be a worthy champion for Tennessee nurses.”

“This year’s meeting ushered in a new strategic direction for the Association,” claimed TNA President Frances Sills. “Each of these members bring experience and passion for the nursing profession and I am confident they will guide this organization to new levels of excellence.”

Dr. Murabito will serve as President-elect until next year's assembly in October and then serve as President for 2015-2016.

6Nov/14Off

PT student research published in professional Journal

A research group of third year graduate students in the School of Physical Therapy, under the direction of Dr. Pat Sells and Dr. Kevin Robinson, recently had a manuscript published in the October issue of The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.  The journal is the official research medium of the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

“We had conversations several years ago with a company making wearable performance jewelry,” explained Dr. Sells, “and agreed to conduct research that clinically tested claims that the product, which included a variety of technologies such as copper, negative ions, holograms, etc., enhanced performance with improved balance, agility and power.”    The students utilized about 60 aerobic exercise tests with subjects under three different conditions: when not wearing the jewelry, when wearing fake jewelry that appeared to be the performance enhancing product, and when wearing jewelry with the performance enhancing technology.  The clinical tests found that the wrist bands had no impact on performance.

The students, who have since graduated with their Doctorate of Physical Therapy degrees, included Hannah Cavicchio, Brittney Everhart, Brandon Grass and Jonathan Lambert.

PTResearch2014

6Nov/14Off

Nursing instructor presents work on end of life simulation

CampSmallSchool of Nursing instructor Sara Camp gave a peer reviewed presentation of her work on end of life simulations for undergraduate nursing students at the National League for Nursing Technology Conference held in Nashville in October. She will also present aspects of this work at the Tennessee Simulation Alliance Conference in November.

“Helping students learn to provide holistic care at the end of life is a priority in nursing education. Opportunities for students to learn deeply about this may not present themselves in routine clinical rotations. Simulation creates a powerful opportunity for this learning to take place. Our students have received tremendous benefit from the end-of-life simulations and I’m so pleased that Ms. Camp is disseminating this work.” said Associate Dean of Nursing, Martha Buckner.

5Nov/14Off

School of Physical Therapy Alum is hired by NBA’s Miami Heat

BrandonBelmont alumnus, Dr. Brandon Gilliam, has been named Director or Rehab and Assistant Athletic Trainer for the Miami Heat of the National Basketball Association. Dr. Gilliam earned his Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree from Belmont University School of Physical Therapy in 2005.  Upon graduation, he began working in private practice clinics in the Nashville area from 2005-2013.  He also provided sports medicine coverage at Christ Presbyterian Academy from 2005-2009.  Prior to accepting the position with the Heat, Gilliam traveled extensively and taught continuing education courses to other health care professionals with the North American Sports Medicine Institute.  In addition, for the past several years, Dr. Gilliam served as an adjunct within the Belmont University  School of Physical Therapy.   In his final year in Nashville, Dr. Gilliam started his own business consulting with professional and collegiate teams and individual athletes as well as providing concierge physical therapy and fitness services for entertainers and athletes.  In his current role as Director of Rehab, Dr. Gilliam is responsible for maintaining the day to day health of all the player currently on the Miami Heat roster.

5Nov/14Off

Nursing Students Participate in End of Life Simulation

death-simulation-114-300x199With an emphasis on experiential learning, Belmont’s School of Nursing provides students with the opportunity to participate in human simulation labs. For Nursing Instructor Sara Camp’s Adult Health II students, this meant taking part in an End of Life lab that simulated the death of a patient, with a volunteer acting as a grieving family member.

When the participating students arrived, they were aware of their patient, Lisa’s, prognosis. Equipped with her report, they were tasked with guiding Lisa and her family member through her final stages of life. As Lisa’s heart rate and pulse slowed, the volunteer family member’s questions sped up. Similar to what would occur in a hospital setting, students were responsible for providing care and comfort for the patient, while assisting the family during a particularly challenging time.

Belmont University Web and Marketing Developer Jon Blankenship participated in the simulation because of a personal connection he has to caregivers who specialize in end of life treatment. His father was recently diagnosed with end stage colon cancer and through the experience, “the one constant we have is how wonderful Dad’s nurses are to him and to us,” Blankenship said. The opportunity to contribute to the education of a nurse who could play that same role for a family in the future was what made Jon sign on. For those nurses, “there aren’t enough thanks to give,” he said.

Camp is committed to equipping students with the skills needed to care for the family system, not just the patients they are assigned. Often, nurses are expected to be experts on caring for patients in their final stages of life in a hospital, regardless of their training or comfort level. Camp said many bedside nurses aren’t confident in the end of life training they have received and because of that, are not adequate resources for new nurses to turn to. “Given that the end of life is such an important event in the life of our patients and their families, it seems irresponsible to leave this to on the job training,” she said.

death-simulation-115-300x199Senior nursing major and simulation participant Blair Bailey would agree. “It is nice to have practiced skills in lab, prior to actually performing the skills in the hospital,” she said. “I will definitely be able to take what I learned from this simulation and take the experience into the real world as a nurse.”

In a debrief following the simulation, senior nursing major Mark Wolter, discussed the challenge of moving from a proactive treatment mentality to one that comforts the family and patient through the final stages of life. Because of Lisa’s signed DNR and DNI, once the final stages of life had come, there was no medical intervention that could be done. Instead of working to raise a heartbeat once it had dropped, the care team was responsible for ensuring the comfort and ease of both the patient and the family. “At this point in a patient’s care, you are treating everyone close to the patient, and you realize the impact that you can have as a nurse in keeping the situation as peaceful as possible,” he said.

Through this and countless other simulations included in Belmont’s program, students are given the opportunity to practice their skills through first hand experiences, preparing them for clinicals and post-graduation careers. Wolter said he is grateful for the emphasis Belmont puts on experiential learning and knows the program continues to advocate for more and more opportunities. “I’m a nail and hammer kind of learner, so that has helped me in a profound way,” he said. “The experiences I have had while at Belmont are beneficial because I have had varying experiences that I will build from in my first job and first few years as a nurse. I am thankful.”

31Oct/14Off

Sullenberger is among 30 most influential social workers

SullenbergerSmallSocial Work Program Chair and Associate Professor Dr. Sabrina Sullenberger was recently honored as one of The Social Work Degree Guide’s 30 most influential social workers alive today. Sullenberger has been a faculty member at Belmont since the summer of 2013, after spending 10 years at Indiana University.  She holds a PhD in Social Work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with research interests in poverty and child welfare. Her work has been internationally published with areas of exploration in the scholarship of teaching and learning. She teaches social work by infusing service learning and hands-on assessment. Sullenberger believes in passing the torch of change in social service to her students.

Selection was based on merit, scholastic study, and political activism. From celebrities to university professors, the list includes individuals who plan, engage, and support social work. Many belong to professional associations that provide ethical guidance and support to various communities. Most have authored books or published journal articles on policy, reform, crisis intervention, and civil liberties.

Information about all 30 social workers can be found at socialworkdegreeguide.com.

 

23Oct/14Off

Nursing faculty member presents at national conferences

Erin-poster-300x206Assistant Professor of Nursing Dr. Erin Shankel has presented her work on tele-monitoring and app-based symptom management in pediatric asthma at two recent national conferences. She presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners in June and at the national Doctor of Nursing Practice conference in October.

23Oct/14Off

Nursing faculty, students publish journal articles

HarveySmallAssociate Professor of Nursing Dr. Carrie Harvey along with nursing graduate students Cassandra Gladkowski, Chelsey Medley, Heather Nelson and Angela Price published a manuscript in the September issue of Journal for Nurse Practitioners, the premier peer-reviewed journal for nurse practitioners. The manuscript was titled “Opioids versus physical therapy for management of chronic pain.” They presented an extensive review the literature and critique of the evidence.

Also, nursing faculty Dr. Jamie Adam and Dr. Leslie Folds published a manuscript in the October issue of that same journal titled “Depression, self-efficacy and adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes.” Their research explored various factors that affect diabetes adherence, finding that as depressive symptoms increase, self-efficacy behaviors decrease.

17Oct/14Off

Nursing adjunct presents poster at Nursing conference

Witherspoon-poster-presentation-300x237Dr. Brianna Witherspoon, adjunct faculty member in the School of Nursing, presented a scientific poster titled “ACNP Intensivists – Evaluating A Model of Care” at the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference in Dallas Texas last week. Witherspoon’s work described patient outcomes such as mortality rates and intensive care unit length of stay before and after acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) joined the critical care team. Witherspoon teaches adult health clinical and lab in the undergraduate nursing program.