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Belmont Partners with Community Organizations to Host Movie Series

Imagine Me _Poster -emvImagine Me summer film series to education, entertain Nashville youth

The Belmont University Troutt Theater will host the International Black Film Festival of Nashville (IBFFN)’s six-week Imagine Me summer film series for children at 10 a.m. on Saturdays between June 28 and July 26 for families to view feature films at discounted rates.

The film series is held in collaboration with Organized Neighbors of Edgehill (ONE), Metro Parks, Easley Historical Recreation Center and the Edgehill Family Resource Center (EFRC) to put quality film programming in the heart of their communities. Imagine Me aims to engage children in the art of film by developing skill and knowledge in media and technology literacy, broadening insights into other cultures, enhancing aptitude for foreign languages, developing critical thinking skills and inspiring a lifelong appreciation for cinema.

“The film series is a must do for IBFFN.  It is a part of our mission to make accessible the many aspects of visual media and effectively  empower this generation  to embrace and participate in the art of storytelling,” said IBFFN Founder and Executive Director Hazel Joyner-Smith.

The series includes a host of short, documentary and feature films that provide positive, educational and family-friendly entertainment. The film line-up includes “Spider Man 2,” “Rio 2,” “The Nut Job,” “Frozen,” French film “Ernest et Célestine” and South African film “Khumba.” The children also will learn about the critical aspects of film in many different areas including directing, producing and during talk back discussions following the showings.

“We’re glad to provide an opportunity to develop the critical thinking and creative skills for the children in our neighborhood and keep them positively occupied for the summer,” said Joyce Searcy, director of community relations at Belmont University.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for our kids to learn the various aspects of film,” said Marlo Lavendar, director of the Easley Historical Recreation Center. “More importantly, it will help in their ability to analyze and critique films and other forms of media.”

Tickets are $1 for children under age 6, $4 for general admission and can be purchased by calling (615) 565-9256. Click here for more information.

Belmont Named Among Top Colleges for Outdoor Enthusiasts

Badge - Great Value CollegesGreatValuesColleges.net has named Belmont University among the 50 most affordable colleges ideal for students who have a passion for outdoor living. The list was complied based on tuition, location and academic and recreation programs for outdoor sports and adventures, including a major in outdoor recreation and a tournament-winning rock climbing team.

Belmont is sited as a “school to watch” for its community relationships built through the renovation and use of E.S. Rose Park, home fields to the University’s baseball, softball, soccer and track team. The publication also mentions Bruin Skydive, Ultimate Frisbee, the Rock Outing Club, equestrian, swim, soccer and tennis clubs.

Nashville Opera Makes First Recording at Belmont University’s Ocean Way Nashville

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Ocean Way Nashville Director Pat McMakin, left, served as associate producer of the Nashville Opera’s first recording.

Nashville Opera and Ocean Way Nashville have recorded Michael Nyman’s “The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat” at Belmont University’s state-of-the-art Music Row studio facility. The project will be the first recording of a Nashville Opera production for commercial distribution, which will be available this fall.

Since its purchase by Belmont University in 2001, Ocean Way Nashville has become a leader in the music production industry, both locally and globally. The recording studio regularly hosts sessions for artists including Bob Seger, Luke Bryan, Blake Shelton and Steve Martin, among others. Additionally, Ocean Way has recorded scores for films and major video games. Operated as a commercial facility, an academic resource and a community partner, Belmont has offered Ocean Way to many organizations within the Nashville community over the years.

“This partnership reflects Belmont’s ongoing effort to be Nashville’s University and to share its resources with the nonprofit community. As Ocean Way Nashville continues to offer recording opportunities to artists on Music Row and educational development opportunities to Belmont students, we are thrilled to carry on a tradition of community partnerships by offering complimentary use of the studio for Nashville Opera’s first opera recording of its recent piece, ‘The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat,’” said Ocean Way Director Pat McMakin, who served as associate producer for the recording.

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Maestro Dean WIlliamson lead the seven-piece orchestra.

The three-day project included the original cast members from Nashville Opera’s critically-acclaimed 2013 production with soprano Rebecca Sjöwall as Mrs. P, bass Matthew Treviño as Dr. P and tenor Ryan MacPherson as Dr. S. The opera’s General and Artistic Director John Hoomes and Chief Operating Officer Noah Spiegel worked as co-producers. Maestro Dean Williamson led the seven-piece orchestra as he did during the original production.

Nashville Opera, Tennessee’s largest professional opera company, is dedicated to creating legendary productions and programs. Among the most successful regional companies in the United States of America, Nashville Opera has presented three different world premiere operas since its inception in 1981. Main stage performances are presented at the Tennessee Performing Arts Center and the Noah Liff Opera Center, playing to over 13,000 people annually. Nashville Opera’s extensive education and outreach touring program reaches over 23,000 students throughout Middle Tennessee. These projects are supported by grants from the Metro Nashville Arts Commission, the Tennessee Arts Commission, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Judy and Noah Liff Foundation, the Nashville Opera Guild and many other corporate and individual supporters.

 

Occupational, Physical Therapy Help Make Disabled Children Mobile

go baby go-111-LThe Inman Health Sciences Building became a workshop and playground on Thursday as part of an international project to promote pediatric mobility. University of Delaware physical therapy professor Cole Galloway and his Pediatric Mobility Lab and Design Studio bought to Belmont Go Baby Go, a program that teaches adults how to modify existing toy cars in a few hours to make them  functional for children with disabilities.

Eight families and their therapists from Tennessee, Kentucky and Georgia worked alongside Belmont occupational therapy and physical therapy students and alumni to learn how to modify toys and the logistics of the Go Baby Go program. Together, they altered Fisher Price Lightning McQueen red cars with Velcro, PVC pipes, pool noodles and kickboards to create wheelchair-like toys. The cars also function as physical therapy devices to teach strength and balance while allowing the disabled children to socialize with other children their age. Through constraint-induced therapy, the children are motivated to use their weaker muscles to gain independence and operate the toys, which by nature are fun. Buttons were moved so that the toy car moves only when a girl with cerebral palsy holds her head up or a boy with a spinal cord injury stands.

For 1-year-old Paisley Queen, she must engage her weak right hand to move her toy car. She suffered an intrauterine stroke and does not use the right side of her body.

“Hopefully, the car will make her more mobile and force her to use her right arm and eventually her right leg and catch her up with her peers who are crawling and starting to walk. That will be a benefit to us,” said her mom Laura Queen, of Mount Juliet, Tennessee. (more…)

Historic Columbia Studio A Reopens as Educational Space for Belmont Students

Linda Curb, Mike Curb, Harold Bradley and Charlie McCoy celebrate the Columbia Studio A grand re-opening.

Linda Curb, Mike Curb, Harold Bradley and Charlie McCoy celebrate the Columbia Studio A grand re-opening.

Mike Curb, Curb Family Foundation in kind gift equivalent of $10 million

Preserving Music City history while shaping the music of the future, Belmont University and the Curb Family Foundation announced today the completed renovation of Columbia Studio A at 34 Music Square East as a classroom and hands-on learning lab for students in Belmont’s Curb College of Entertainment and Music Business. Through his Curb Family Foundation, Curb Records’ founder and CEO Mike Curb is giving the University a 40-year lease on the 34 Music Square East property (including office spaces, Columbia Studio A and the Quonset Hut) as an in kind contribution, an estimated donation value topping $10 million.

A-Team session musician Charlie McCoy greets Belmont President Dr. Bob Fisher.

A-Team session musician Charlie McCoy greets Belmont President Dr. Bob Fisher.

From its opening in the mid-1950s as part of Bradley Studios to the building’s purchase by Columbia Records in 1962 to its transition to office space in 1982, Columbia Studio A and the Quonset Hut provided the sonic landscape for many of that generation’s biggest hits and greatest artists, including Bob Dylan, who recorded his legendary 1969 Nashville Skyline album in the most recently renovated space. “A-Team” session musician Charlie McCoy, who played on Nashville Skyline, noted that thanks to Dylan recording in town at Columbia Studio A, “Nashville was certified as a recording center in music to artists who might never have come here otherwise.”

Other artists who’ve graced the building include Dusty Springfield, Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline, Brenda Lee, Buddy Holly, Loretta Lynn, George Jones, Tammy Wynette, Charlie Rich, The Byrds, Patti Page, Elvis Costello, Simon & Garfunkel, and many more. Today’s event was opened by rising I.R.S. Nashville band Striking Matches, a duo who first met when paired together in a Belmont guitar class.

Striking Matches' Sarah Zimmerman and Justin Davis meet legendary artist Brenda Lee.

Striking Matches’ Sarah Zimmerman and Justin Davis meet legendary artist Brenda Lee.

“If these walls could talk,” said Brenda Lee, who spoke at today’s announcement, “they could recount a virtual ‘who’s who’ of great artists and hit songs that first found life here… Thanks to the vision of today’s industry leadership—to men such as Dr. Bob Fisher, president of Belmont University, and Mike Curb, whose namesake Curb College of Entertainment and Music Business is unparalleled as a music industry learning resource—thanks to them, these walls can and will ‘talk’ to a new generation of young creativity that will come here to experience and learn where it all began. And for that, we can all be grateful.”

Dr. Fisher added, “When it comes to honoring Nashville’s music roots, we all need to thank Mike Curb for both his generous contributions and visionary commitment to keep that history alive in this town for future generations to recognize and enjoy. But Mike’s vision extends beyond our history to our future, as he has and continues to be a tremendous resource for tomorrow’s legendary artists through his support of Belmont’s Curb College. We’re truly grateful for his contributions to all of our programs.”

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