Homework Hotline, Belmont Partner to Tutor Metro Students

Homework Hotline at Belmont Director Sammy Swor works on the third floor of the library to help grade-school students through free tutoring by phone.

Courtney Covert’s first phone call was a tough one: 29 minutes working through three long-division problems with a fifth grade student whose first language is Spanish; but the junior from Cumming, Ga. said she learned just as much as she taught.

“She taught me a memory trick to remember the order of long division. She remembered ‘dad, mother, sister, brother, rose’ from class, and I helped her understand it meant ‘divide, multiply, subtract, bring down, remainder’ and how to apply it,” Covert said. “She felt accomplished in the end, and it made me so proud because it is like a Good Samaritan gesture since we don’t use names.”

Dozens of calls just like Covert’s ring the third floor of the Lila D. Bunch Library on weeknights. Students in kindergarten through 12th grade call the Homework Hotline at Belmont at (615) 298-6636 between 4 and 8 p.m. for free tutoring on any academic subject.

The Homework Hotline at Belmont ribbon cutting ceremony was Nov. 14.

A ribbon cutting ceremony was held Wednesday, marking the one-month anniversary of the satellite hotline, which is funded by the Frist Foundation and Joe C. Davis Foundation. Mayor Karl Dean, State Rep. Gary Odom, Joe C. Davis Foundation Trustee Bill DeLoache, Frist Foundation President Pete Bird and Metro Nashville Public Schools Chief Operating Officer Fred Carr cut the blue ribbon alongside Belmont Provost Thomas Burns.

The hotline is averaging 85 calls a week. Three in every four calls are about middle-school math, and one out of three calls is from parents or grandparents, said Homework Hotline at Belmont Director Sammy Swor.

“It is very unique for a university to be involved in this. There are only three partnerships like this in the country,” Swor said. “I see the students getting more and more involved because it is already very popular with Metro and Belmont students, and I am worried that our four phone lines may not be enough.”

Although the Belmont’s hotline is intended to serve students in Middle Tennessee area codes, calls have come from New York, Pennsylvania, Indiana and California.

Among the 30 Belmont students helping grade-school students understand linear equations, phases of the moon and sentence structure are work-study students, Reformed University Fellowship volunteers, education majors working toward their practicum and other students seeking community service convocation credit.

Students tutor by phone at the Homework Hotline at Belmont on the third floor of the Lila D. Burch Library.

“I choose to work the Homework Hotline because I tutored in high school,” said Angela Brothers, a Belmont freshman from Hendersonville, Tenn. “It helps the kids, and you get fulfillment out of sharing your knowledge.”

After taking fifth grade language arts and math tests and going through child abuse prevention training, Belmont students work in two-hour shifts manning four phone lines. Calls in foreign languages or more difficult than students’ scope are funneled to the main Homework Hotline, which has operated in West Nashville since 1990.

“We are thrilled to have this partnership with Belmont,” said Homework Hotline Director Wendy Kurland. “We have many more requests than tutors. This will make a huge difference for struggling students who want and need free tutoring.”


Office of Communications
Greg Pillon: 615.460.6645

Belmont University
1900 Belmont Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37212
615.460.6000

About Belmont University

Ranked No. 7 in the Regional Universities South category and named for the sixth consecutive year as one of the top “Up-and-Comer” universities by U.S. News & World Report, Belmont University consists of more than 6,900 students who come from every state and more than 25 countries. Committed to being a leader among teaching universities, Belmont brings together the best of liberal arts and professional education in a Christian community of learning and service. The University’s purpose is to help students explore their passions and develop their talents to meet the world’s needs, a fact made evident in the University’s hometown, Nashville, where students, faculty and staff served more than 243,000 hours of community service (valued at more than $5 million) during 2012. With more than 80 areas of undergraduate study, 22 master’s programs and five doctoral degrees, there is no limit to the ways Belmont University can expand an individual's horizon.
For more information visit www.belmont.edu